(Source: blackcupcakekitty)

(Reblogged from petitpoulailler)
simena:

GERALD NORDEN

simena:

GERALD NORDEN

(Reblogged from thegiftsoflife)

beautyartislam:

Ceramic jugs from 11th-13th century Iran. [x]

(Reblogged from beautyartislam)
purplefigtree:

Flask
Nishapur, Iran, 1523.

There is a long tradition of pottery production in Nishapur. During the Safavid period, the artistic and merchant community must have supported the local industry, as Nishapur was not directly associated with the court, who were the usual patrons. Although destroyed by earthquakes and Mongols, a pottery industry was re-established by 1430, following the Diaspora of potters from Samarqand in 1411. This flask, dated 930 AH / 1523-4 AD, was produced in the decades before Iran was flooded with mass-produced Chinese export porcelain in the Jiajing and later Wanli periods, around 1550-1625.
The shape is ultimately based on metal pilgrim flasks, such as the large Syrian brass canteen, dating to the mid-13th century, in the collection of the Freer Gallery, Washington. The form was designed to be carried by travellers or slung from horse trappings by straps attached to handles, now missing, along with the neck. In ceramics, pilgrim flasks, presumably ornamental, appear in early 15th century Chinese porcelain in the Yongle and Xuande periods, possibly made as diplomatic gifts.
The decoration is also inspired by Chinese porcelain of the Xuande period (1426-35), which suggests that in the finest examples the potters had access to a courtly collection of “antique” porcelain. However, this flask, part of a group, which includes a pilgrim flask painted with ducks, in the Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, which is a more loose interpretation of a Chinese prototype, and a large dish in the Middle Eastern Culture Center in Mitaka, Tokyo, with a very similar design. The Tokyo dish has two birds and an inscription with the date 929 AH / 1522-3 AD as well as the name of the place of manufacture “Nishapur”.

purplefigtree:

Flask

Nishapur, Iran, 1523.

There is a long tradition of pottery production in Nishapur. During the Safavid period, the artistic and merchant community must have supported the local industry, as Nishapur was not directly associated with the court, who were the usual patrons. Although destroyed by earthquakes and Mongols, a pottery industry was re-established by 1430, following the Diaspora of potters from Samarqand in 1411. This flask, dated 930 AH / 1523-4 AD, was produced in the decades before Iran was flooded with mass-produced Chinese export porcelain in the Jiajing and later Wanli periods, around 1550-1625.

The shape is ultimately based on metal pilgrim flasks, such as the large Syrian brass canteen, dating to the mid-13th century, in the collection of the Freer Gallery, Washington. The form was designed to be carried by travellers or slung from horse trappings by straps attached to handles, now missing, along with the neck. In ceramics, pilgrim flasks, presumably ornamental, appear in early 15th century Chinese porcelain in the Yongle and Xuande periods, possibly made as diplomatic gifts.

The decoration is also inspired by Chinese porcelain of the Xuande period (1426-35), which suggests that in the finest examples the potters had access to a courtly collection of “antique” porcelain. However, this flask, part of a group, which includes a pilgrim flask painted with ducks, in the Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, which is a more loose interpretation of a Chinese prototype, and a large dish in the Middle Eastern Culture Center in Mitaka, Tokyo, with a very similar design. The Tokyo dish has two birds and an inscription with the date 929 AH / 1522-3 AD as well as the name of the place of manufacture “Nishapur”.

(Reblogged from brassmanticore)
artemis444:

Islamic Ceramic Tile at the Louvre Museum

artemis444:

Islamic Ceramic Tile at the Louvre Museum

(Reblogged from artemis444-deactivated20131011)

artofrenda:

image

Title: Bowl Depicting a Running Hare

Country: Egypt

Medium: Earthenware; luster-painted on opaque white glaze

Date: early 11th century

(Reblogged from artofrenda)

ornaments-of-the-world:

FREER GALLERY OF ART ~ Washington D C by sftrajan on Flickr.

bowl - Iran or Afghanistan -
10th C
earthenware

(Reblogged from ornaments-of-the-world)

purplefigtree:

Dish

Iran, 17th century.

(Reblogged from brassmanticore)

sisterwolf:

Purim Costumes, Tehran, 1964

(Reblogged from savage-america)

islamic-cultures:

The so-called Baptistère de Saint Louis, a richly figurative brass Mamluk basin inlaid with gold and silver from 14th-century Syria or Egypt, was used to baptize the French King Louis XIII and some other Frensh kings, the Louvre, Paris.

بيت عماد القديس لويس الذي استخدم في تعميد الملك لويس الثالث عشر وملوك عدة من ملوك فرنسا، وهو في الأساس حوض نحاسي عائد لحقبة المماليك مرصع بالذهب والفضة نفذ في مصر أو سوريا في القرن الرابع عشر، متحف اللوفر، باريس

(Reblogged from islamic-cultures)